Ryan Welton

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Tag Archives: fitness

Runner’s Diary: So, I didn’t quite run 10 miles this week

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It’s evident what stretching before a run will do for you. Better recovery, fewer aches and improved runs.

My goal this week was 10 miles for the week, up from 7.35 the week before. I didn’t quite get there, but I did up my total.

8.84 miles

So, my long run for Sunday was 4.20 miles, a totally average run for me two years ago.

Weather conditions were nearly perfect: started at about 49 degrees with sunshine and a very light Oklahoma breeze. If anything was negative about the conditions, it would be the angle of thesun right now. It’s right in your eyes during the early-to-mid-morning hours.

For the second week in a row, I earned my miles across three runs, one gym run, one neighborhood run and one long neighborhood run.

The first neighborhood did feature some resistance as soon-to-be 10-year-old Olivia tan with me tugging to my running shirt as if I were a horse.

I’m still taking way too many walking breaks for my taste, but I’m moving — and for any of you out there looking to start a fitness program that involves running, moving is the point.

We’ll try for 10 cumulative miles this week.

Happy running!

Daily Video, Episode 2: Exercise motivation + Back to the gym!

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Several weeks ago, I had some dental work done that left me in a lot of pain. The work wasn’t the cause of the pain although I wasn’t in pain before I had the work. Instead, the work really just exposed some issues and, somewhere in there, I got an infection in a couple of molars that sure felt like it spread to my jaw as a whole.

Five weeks worth of pain and easily seven or eight visits to the dentist and endodontist.

Well, the pain and a sore mouth makes is super easy to avoid healthier options and, instead, eat softer and more high-calorie foods. In that time, I stopped exercising and miraculously didn’t gain any weight. I had gained some during the time when Mom was sick, but for the entire year, I really haven’t had a good workout routine.

I got back to it today. Did two miles on the treadmill.

It’s important that I not try to make up for every moment of lost time in one workout. I made it a point to stretch both before and after my run, and I neither ran too fast nor too far.

It felt good.

I’m not one to like discomfort, which is what exercise seems to be sometimes. However, this video from Joe Rogan does a fantastic job of explaining the role of exercise in how we feel. As a side note, this video was very well done.

Our physical well-being is tied to our emotional and mental well-being, and those two are tied back to physical. However, if we take care of the physical part of things, we’ll find ourselves off to a good start on the other two. It all works together.

Aside from that, I know I’m not the greatest videographer on my block, much less on YouTube, but damn if I don’t enjoy this process. I just hope to get better at it over time. I’d love any tips you might have for me. I know I need to get a lav mic set up for my iPhone or, heck, maybe just a better camera altogether.

But first priorities first, and that means workout No. 2 happens on Sunday.

Hope you’ll come find me on YouTube at youtube.com/ryanweltonmusic or venture on over to Twitter @ryanwelton. 

Fitness Hack: Using sports to pile on the steps

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Since I’ve downloaded the Pedometer++ app, I’ve become a bit obsessed with checking my steps. Considering I have an iPhone and an Apple Watch, I’m not sure why I’m just now really attuned to how much movement I can produce in a given day, but there you go.

I topped 20,000 steps Saturday.

Weekends aren’t lazy for me. I’m go-go-go, whether it on personal projects or chores, and I tend to get more exercise, too.

If you read my blog last week, you’ll know I’m focused on walking at the moment to help ignite some weight loss and strengthen my Achilles tendons. I need to get in leg shape before I get back to running, and I’d like that temperature to get down a bit more, too. We’ve been enjoying upper 80s and lower 90s here in Oklahoma, quite the change from typical 100-degree days this time of year.

My Mom’s treadmill that I inherited is upstairs, and I’m using it every chance I get. I’ve found an easy, easy weekend hack to getting my steps up, too!

Walk during your favorite sporting events.

In my case, I follow Tottenham Hotspur, whose Premier League season started a week ago with a 2-1 win over Newcastle. Spurs won 3-1 over Fulham this weekend to top the league table.

And I walked on the treadmill for the entire match at an easy 2.8 speed.

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By 10:30 a.m., I was at 11,000 steps on my way to 20,000.

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Sure, I mowed the yard later in the day, which means I probably would have hit 10,000 regardless. However, I’ll take any opportunity I can get to push myself well beyond 10,000 steps — especially for those days when I can’t come close.

Sometimes work and life come first no matter what your fitness priorities are.

But what I’ve found is that if you have time to watch sports, you’ve got time to walk — and a soccer match at 90 minutes is totally doable, halftime and all.

#COYS

Quest to get back into running shape starts with walking

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It was four years ago when I first got into running. I’ve run four or five 5Ks and three half-marathons, and I plan to run more for sure.

But for the moment, I’m walking. I don’t dare say ‘just’ walking because much of the latest research shows walking to be more effective for weight loss, which is precisely what I need to be able to get back into running shape, which is something I need both physically and mentally long-term. My running routine was fantasic until this colder-than-normal winter plus a bout of flu in January totally derailed me.

And then on the last Sunday in April, it was 70 degrees outside, which is way too hot for a half-marathon (truly), and my lack of proper training combined with a mild weight gain led to a much slower time for moi. I was happy to finish, but everything about my effort this year sucked. I thought I could work it mind-over-matter, but I actually needed to face facts.

I’m almost 48 years old.

I’m close to 220 pounds.

When I ran my fastest time in 2017 (2:48:00-ish), I was only 205, so I basically ran a half-marathon this year while carrying a sack of potatoes.

Mmmm, French fries.

Unfortunately, the circumstances surrounding me writing this blog and even walking in an effort to get back into shape was all the result of my mom passing away earlier this summer. Technically spring. I wrote about it here.

And I inherited her treadmill.

Dragging it upstairs, I placed it strategically across from a TV so that I had no excuse but to get some steps in and catch up on a bevy of TV shows I would never watch otherwise. Maybe I’d just watch sports. Or YouTube.

As part of a work incentive, I’m trying to hit a certain number of steps per day, month and quarter. I don’t really even know for sure right now what they are. I’ll have to look them up, but I’ve set a goal of 12,000 steps per day for myself in the hopes of getting super consistent about hitting 10,000.

And now I’ve done it for three consecutive days. It feels good. One of the advantages of walking versus running, to start, is that I’m not famished afterward. It also helps to get me nice and tired for bedtime, and it creates for me a daily routine and goal, structure that I’ve always craved.

The goal is simple: Hit 10,000 steps every single day at the bare minimum.

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I’m hoping the result will be to get me down to 200 or below at some point soon.

And at that point the weather will be cooler, and I’m going to be running again. Outside. Where we were meant to run.

I’m going to document that process here, leading us from now until next year’s Oklahoma City (half-)marathon.

Over the weekend, I was able to achieve well more than 10,000 steps. Heck, the past couple of weekends, I’ve had a dalliance with 20,000.

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That helps given that I’m still prone to a candy binge or a couple of beers here and there, but I still need to shed that extra weight to help me get back into my running groove.

Whether I’m able to get there in a timely manner is something you’ll be able to see and to know about right here.

Featured image: Larry D. Moore CC BY-SA 4.0

Review: WalMart’s ‘Keep It Green’ pre-packaged smoothies

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So, Kristi and I have been drinking smoothies for breakfast for at least a month. Our first foray into smoothie-world was centered on fruits, spinach and Greek yogurt.

I’ll write about it another time, but we recently added peanut powder, hemp seeds, chia seeds and cacao nibs to our smoothie repertoire.

And this morning, we tried our first pre-packaged smoothie. It was WalMart’s Great Value-branded “Keep It Green” pre-packaged smoothies with pineapple, mango, avocado and spinach.

It had three servings, which for our purposes is a bit odd unless young Olivia would also want one.

And she wouldn’t.

This smoothie pack was easy to put together. You just opened the package, put it into your smoothie cup and add 8 oz. of water.

The taste? It tasted like a super healthful smoothie. Heavy on the green and light on the fruit. Could have definitely used a little honey.

However, it wasn’t awful and it was unquestionably healthful.

What do you like to put in your smoothies?

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I’m on kind of a health kick in the days after mom’s passing, not because I recognize my own mortality but because I recognize my own frailty. I just need to shed a few pounds and be more purposeful about what I put into my body.

It’s a daily, hourly struggle.

So, I’m on a smoothie kick.

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However, I’m a novice and would totally love your input as to ingredients and recipes that would work with a simple Magic Bullet appliance. My go-to recipe is pretty easy, actually:

  • Spinach
  • Banana
  • Cherries
  • Pineapple
  • Raspberries
  • Blackberries
  • Strawberries
  • Blueberries
  • Greek yogurt
  • Milk
  • Honey

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I’m looking to maximize my satiety throughout the day and the health benefit of anything I eat first thing in the morning. I’m also trying to get good at the process of making the smoothie, which can take more time than you’d expect if you don’t mix the ingredients just right.

Over the next few weeks, I’ll share my favorite combos — and an update on how much weight I’m shedding due to some simple changes in diet.

I always remind myself: You can’t outwork your mouth.

Diet first. Exercise second.

Runners blog: smoky skies a reason to take my long run inside

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The plan was to run around Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City, 9.73 miles to prove to myself that my legs are ready for the OKC Memorial Marathon half on April 29.

Mother Nature had other ideas.

If it had been cold, rain or some combo thereof, I would have powered through it. However, these were wildfires in northwest Oklahoma — and the smoke blew into the city.

Friday night, Oklahoma City looked like fallout central for a large volcano. Hazy. Smoky. Tough to breathe.

My little run? Not so important.

First-responders were working their tails off in Dewey County and Roger Mills County. Homes burned. Cattle was lost, as was a human life.

Nevertheless, I didn’t want to run outside in compromised air, not two weeks before my half. The air quality was mostly better the next morning, but the Oklahoma wind was blowing at 40-50 mph.

Ridiculous.

So, I hit the treadmill at the Northside OKC YMCA for 10 miles. And came out a-ok.

Treadmill running is b-o-r-I-n-g. Zzzz.

No foot pain. Legs were a little tight. And I was good-to-go the next day.

I’m ready for another year, more and more convinced that even running novices (moderate novices) overtrain for half-marathons. They’re not that hard if finishing is your main thing.

Finishing faster? That’s a whole other thing — but keeping the legs and feet fresh these next two weeks is priority No. 1.

Runner’s blog: How I got started running and why I love it

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The minute I felt it, I knew my back was screwed. At least for awhile.

I used to get sciatica pretty bad in my early 30s, and then I didn’t get it again much until the past year. Yet I don’t know for sure that the thing keeping me from running this past weekend was sciatica. It might be muscle spasms of some sort. It might be arthritis. If I check WebMD, I’m sure it will be cancer. I don’t think it’s anything terribly serious since, after 48 hours, the pain and discomfort has largely subsided.

However, it’s mighty inconvenient.

I have a half-marathon to run in five weeks.

Here’s the reality: Come April 29, I’m traveling 13.1 miles, even if I crawl it. Last year, I over-trained in my most humble of opinion, and while I bested my time from the previous year by five minutes, I also wasn’t sure I’d be able to run it at all, as late as the night before, when I was pounding Advil because of foot pain.

Mind over matter. Good chemistry over both.

But I’m not messing around with an achy back. I spent my Saturday largely on the couch with an ice pack and a fair amount of ibuprofen, before I was told by my chiropractor sister-in-law that I needed to be walking. That led me to go to the grocery store, and I freely admit that the walking helped.

Sitting bad. Walking good. I guess it keeps the joints lubricated.

Nevertheless, I wanted to get some kind of value out of a wasted weekend. I say “wasted” because I’m not the type of person who sits around and does nothing. This was a wasted weekend, but yet it was valuable because rest and recovery are valuable. They’re absolutely necessary, and if I’m guilty of anything in my journey to improve as a runner, it’s that I’ve taken the running part of it seriously but not any of the rest of it.

The recovery. The stretching. The strength training. The diet. Documenting it all.

I’m the Allen Iverson of running. “Practice?”

I’m the anti-Joel Embiid of of running. I don’t “trust the process.”

That’s two 76ers references in one post. Impressive.

I joked in one of my recent YouTube videos that I’m not a runner, I just like to run. That makes no sense. Of course I’m a runner. Look at all them selfies!

But I’m a slow runner compared to most. I’m really rollin’ when I average a 11:30-12:00 mile. Most of the time, I hover around 13:00.

All that matters is that I started running.

And I got started running nearly four years ago when I started walking.

And I started walking because of work.

I worked in the corporate communications department for Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores. They’re super passionate about supporting Children’s Hospitals across the country, and especially the Children’s Miracle Network. I worked closely with the Love family on this. Their support is genuine. They’ve raised $20M over the years for this terrific organization.

I did NOT get to meet Marie Osmond. That would have been cool. I would have told her of my love for the song, “There’s No Stopping Your Heart.” Seriously, I would have.

Anyway, CMN had this new thing called a Miracle Marathon, where folks would walk a mile each day over the course of a month, eventually reaching 27.2 miles, which is one mile more than an actual marathon.

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Our team walked together each morning, a walking morning meeting of sorts. I was into it, even buying a pair of walking shoes from Amazon so that I could walk without wearing out my dressier shoes. And that walking turned into lunchtime walking, which turned into running.

I think the thing that really made running click with my personality is the idea that I could compete on a regular basis, and it was all on me. Yes, I’m referring to 5Ks and 10Ks, not that I didn’t know they existed. It’s just that I never really put it together in my head that, theoretically, I could go to any city, anywhere, and run their event. By myself if need be.

The sheer solitary nature of running is appealing to me as an introvert.

I don’t want to run with the pack.

I want to run by my ********* self.

Once this clicked, running clicked, at least mentally.

Except for the running part. The one-leg-in-front-of-the-other part of it. The slowness. The heavy breathing. The out-of-shapedness. It took some time for the sport of running to click physically with me.

I attacked the sport (yes, it’s a sport) the same way one would attack eating an elephant: one bite at a time. I couldn’t run a full mile without stopping at least once. I might have been able to run three total, if I took enough breaks. However, I was determined to give it a go, setting a goal for myself to run the 5K at the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon in April 2015.

That causes me to chuckle a bit in 2018, the idea that I was kind of intimidated by a 5K. Alas, while I laugh about it relative to me, I’m hyper-sensitive about that relative to other people, folks who might feel inferior because they can’t run a mile much less a 5K. In my eyes, anybody who decides they want to run, to take a serious stab at the sport, is embarking on the holiest of personal efforts.

Running is about improving physically.

Running is about sharpening mentally.

Running is a competition of one: You vs. yourself.

And, truth be told, you could substitute walking for running, or make it swimming or any activity that gets the blood pumping. I find all these quests to be sacred.

However, I chose running.

I finished my first 5K in 2015, the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon 5K, in 43 minutes. It’s my slowest race 5K to-date with my best being 33 minutes. I have yet to break the 30-minute mark, but I truly think if the weather were just right and I had an extra bounce in my step and the right tunes, I could break 30.

Truly, I need to be doing more 5Ks. They satisfy the itch to get out there among other runners and test yourself.

For my first one, I was truly worried about finishing it, and was slightly embarrassed that I wasn’t able to run the whole thing — that is, until I realized that maintaining a gallop isn’t required. You can stop and walk for a bit if you feel like it.

That’s right. Other people do that, too. Heck, nowadays, I run races where packs of good runners walk often to catch their wind and drink a Gatorade.

And just like that, a little more shame peeled away. Shame is everywhere on this planet, and the more we can rob it of its power, the better.

Alas, I thought, “I can do this!”

Of course, the competitor in me wanted to finish a 5K faster, much faster than 43 minutes. There are ultimately limits to how fast I’d be able to go. I’m 47 years old, and I wasn’t fast when I was 15. It’s funny. I asked a friend of mine, a fantastic runner, about speed. He told me it’s shockingly simple. You just have to run faster. Your body will get used to it after awhile.

He’s several years older than me and in killer shape.

I don’t think it’s that simple.

At first, I trained by running the treadmill at my local YMCA in Norman, Okla. Eventually, I took it outside and started running around my block. Five times around is exactly three miles. Ten spins around the ol’ block is just about a 10K, and I guesstimate that 22 times around constitutes a half marathon.

However, I graduated from that quickly. I plotted a course in my neighborhood that runs up and down Robinson Street. I started running to the beautiful University of Oklahoma campus and back. After awhile, I started running at Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City. One trip around the dam is exactly 9.73 miles per Map My Run from last year.

The idea that I’d run 9.73 at any point with only a couple of walking stops was ludicrous to me in 2015.

And yet there I was in 2016, preparing for my first half-marathon.

For the record, I didn’t follow a plan or run with a training pack, although I did run a Red Coyote event at the Oklahoma City Zoo that was really enjoyable. I’d use apps like Map My Walk or Run to keep track of my miles, and I’d loosely review half-marathon plans to gauge whether I was doing too much or too little.

I tried to be sure to listen to my body religiously, to the point of not taking Advil when I was sore because I needed to listen to my body. I’m not convinced that’s a smart thing because NSAIDs help reduce inflammation, which I understand to be a good thing. I’m torn.

Eventually, I ran ten miles one weekend and then almost 12 on another, and it damn near killed me. I was gassed by the end of the run, walking into the 7-Eleven at Robinson and Flood and Norman and guzzling a Gatorade right there on the spot. Luckily, I carried some means of paying for the product, lest my running habit land me in the pokey.

In retrospect, two runs beyond ten miles for a half-marathon was overkill. Here’s why: whether it be a 5K, a half-marathon or probably a full marathon, if the event is worth its salt, then you’re going to be filled with adrenaline.

In the case of the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon, you’re also filled with a lot of emotion, especially if you’re from the Sooner State and happen to know anybody impacted by the terrorist attack of April 19, 1995. The emotion plus the adrenaline is easily worth three miles.

Add the cheering fans and drumlines and the gorilla along Gorilla Hill, and it might be worth five miles!

I recall at my first half-marathon in 2016 overhearing several people say they didn’t train at all. They’re just running 13.1 miles cold. Mind you, they’re in good shape. But still.

The Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon, as an event, cemented my love for running and absolutely set the bar for me as to what a great event should feel like. My first half-marathon in 2016 ended with a time of 2:53:00.

My goal was to be under 3:00:00, and I did that.

My next goal was to eclipse 2:53:00.

And I did. 2:48:xx.

Half-marathon, Year 2 disappointed me quite a bit, initially, because I was pacing at 2:30:xx for the first half of the run. I used my MapMyRun app, and I saw that I was running 11:30 miles from the starting line to the state Capitol. That’s pretty good.

But that gave way to 13:00 and 14:00 miles once the cheerleaders and drumlines and local cheerleaders faded away, by the time you’re running across Northwest 50th Street. The last 4-5 miles of the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon half-marathon route are pretty sparse. That’s when runners need the encouragement the most.

If I may, a note about encouragement: The folks who cheer runners on are a big damned deal, and I never would have guessed that before I ran my first half. I had no idea how helpful it was, but that encouragement is powerful.

Nevertheless, I finished with a time better than the year before, and that was the goal. So, I’ll celebrate that. I’ll also recognize this: it felt significantly easier the second year than the first.

What was different?

Well, I was suffering from foot pain toward the end of April, probably from over-training, although I hadn’t trained as much in Year 2 as I had in Year 1. I did a 9.73-mile run around Hefner and called it a day as far as my longest training run. The pain was so bad that I was not 100 percent sure I’d be able to run the half, as late as the night before.

The other thing that was different was my carb loading and night-before routine. First, carb loading is real and effective for a long run. Basically, you eat as much Italian as you can stand between Thursday and Saturday before a Sunday event. Fill up those carb stores to the max. Second, Kristi and I got a hotel downtown, blocks from the race, so I didn’t have to wake up at 3:30 in the morning to eat breakfast and then drive downtown and park.

Again, that’s a secret for me that wasn’t a secret to anybody else. Of course it helps to stay close to the race, especially if it’s big. I get two extra hours of sleep and don’t have to expend as much energy between home and the course. Our choice was the Hampton Inn, and we snuggled in by 9 p.m. the night before and watched a re-run of Johnny Carson from about 1975. Back before 1980, Johnny was on for 90 minutes every night, and the absolute best era for Johnny was the 1970s.

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I brought my pre-race breakfast, too, and stuck it in the fridge: Waffles with breaded chicken breast and syrup. The waffles are frozen and the chicken breast, too. It was all soggy after I microwaved it the next morning, but my body couldn’t tell any difference in terms of energy. I needed that protein, those carbohydrates and all that sugar.

It fueled me.

And that takes me back to today, recovering from a tweaked back and a sore ass. Aging is not for the timid, but stretching and other techniques for self-care are available to the willing. I just can’t run and run and run without training and stretching and massaging, foam rolling and plenty of rest.

My goal for the 2018 Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon half-marathon is anything below 2:48:00. My confidence isn’t real high; I’m 15 pounds heavier than I was last year.

However, I’m also a year wiser, and maybe there is something to not training as much. Maybe I’ll be fresher.

Besides, like my in-shape runner friend told me, “If you want to go faster, all you have to do is, well, go faster!”

Makes sense to me.

8 New Year’s resolutions for 2018

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New Year’s 2018 greeted the United States with a deep freeze, colder weather than we’ve seen in these parts in half a decade. For me, that meant an evening indoors with some frozen yogurt, cookies and a splash of cider. We watched Mariah Carey beg for hot tea in Times Square, where it felt like -7 degrees, without a thought of stepping outside for any reason in 13-degree Oklahoma City.

A quiet evening inside also afforded me a few minutes to consider resolutions for the new year.

Resolution No. 1: Plan some travel.

Kristi and I worked out a trip to Los Angeles this summer to catch both a Dodgers home game and the UCLA home opener under Chip Kelly at the Rose Bowl, the first football game at the historic venue after my beloved Oklahoma Sooners fell to Georgia in the College Football Playoff. The year in travel also includes a midsummer’s jaunt to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and a pre-summer weekend trip back to the Virginia countryside to attend a wedding. We even worked through a handful of nearby sporting adventures, including a weekend getaway to Beaver’s Bend in southeastern Oklahoma and a weekend road trip to Wichita to catch a Wichita State Shockers home basketball game.

I love doing stranger-in-a-strange-land sports trips, and I’ve always liked the Shockers.

Resolution No. 1 is in the books.

Resolution No. 2 is to drink more tea. I was thumbing through one of my “Cooking Light” magazines that I got last year as part of a ‘Mags for Miles’ promotion (meaning they didn’t cost me a dime), and I saw a couple of ads for tea that looked tasty. I thought, “Yeah, I should have more of that.” Green, black, orange pekoe. Doesn’t matter. One a day.

I didn’t have one today, but I had one yesterday. It’s all about progress, right?

There’s no reason this one is No. 2, by the way. It doesn’t hold any magical weight over Nos. 3, 4 or any other. I suppose No. 2 should have been to eat more roughage, if I were wanting to be cheeky.

Resolution No. 3 is to get back into yoga. Actually, this resolution is more about working in different types of exercise into my routine. That could be a spin class or Pilates, but ideally I’d like it to include at least twice-a-month yoga. I’ve always felt great after a yoga session.

Resolution No. 4 is related to No. 3: become a morning workout person. This one is a challenge for me because I don’t get up easily. I have to wake up and then get conscious, and it takes 10-15 minutes for me to muster the will to move. Hell, who am I kidding? This one is never going to happen, but the benefits of working out in the morning are well documented. It provides motivation for the day in that you’ve achieved something early, and it fires up your metabolism, provided you follow that workout with a healthful breakfast. Plus, you can control the beginning of your day more than you can the end of it, meaning there will be fewer days missed due to the unforeseen. It’s about self-discipline as much as anything else.

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Pass the donuts and pour me some coffee.

Resolution No. 5 is to use my slow cookers more. I have three Crock Pots, and I barely touch them. I’ve always been paranoid about leaving appliances on while I’m away from the house, which is ridiculous because you’re supposed to do that will slow cookers. It requires a little bit of planning, but I’d be happy with 2-3 slow-cooker meals per month. I’ve already done well with this one, as I just finished a bowl of pot roast that I made all by myself.

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The Crock Pot didn’t burn my house down either.

Resolution No. 6 is the continuation of a routine Kristi and I started at bars and restaurants in 2017, and that’s to never order the same things twice. If you’re like me at all, you order the same things at the same places all the time, over and over. However, it doesn’t allow for nice surprises, such as when we went to Roy’s in Phoenix last year, and I had my first drink with cucumber vodka.

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It was a taste-bud revelation!

Resolution No. 7 is more learning. I’ve pondered finishing a Master’s. I’ve pondered delving into home-device development skills. And I’m learning on a daily basis in the world of digital content and social media, which change constantly. From a tactical perspective, that means more reading, more consumption and lots more creation to see what works and what doesn’t. Creating something from nothing is the joy of my vocational and avocational existence — and for what I do and the world I live in, there has never been a better time to be alive.

And last but not least, Resolution No. 8 is to chase imbalance. I read an article the other day in the New York Times about how perhaps what we need is a little less balance, that some of us need to be better equipped with keen self-awareness.

I happen to like motion, the pursuit, the grind, the chase, the process and the evolution. I don’t enjoy rest although I respect my body and mind when they need it.

I’ve never really needed or wanted balance.

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Connecting enhances the experience, so if you’re reading this and want to connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn or Snapchat (soonerryan2000), I’d love it if you did so!

Hope your New Year is fantastic, filled with health and prosperity.

Featured image courtesy of Roudoudou Hirons on Flickr

Health & Fitness: Can you lose weight with a walking-only exercise regimen?

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I’m a runner insomuch that I enjoy running. To me, it is not a chore; it is respite from a day’s stress. I have gone weeks where I run 4-5 times, and I’ve gone weeks where I don’t run at all.

As much as I enjoy running, there are aspects of it that are hard to make habit:

  • Sometimes I get sore after a 3-4 mile run.
  • My allergies act up when I run outside.
  • It eats up time.

Unless my knees give out or I lose a foot to a freak accident, I’m going to keep running.

But I’m also going to walk.

I’m going to walk at least for the next 2-3 months to try to solidify a habit of going to the gym every single day and doing something to put my body in motion. My plan is to do this without injury and without ever making my body feel like it’s been overworked.

My plan is to do this and lose that extra 10-15 pounds that have been nagging at me.

But science.

Yes, I understand that it requires a deficit of 3,500 calories to lose one pound. However, the way I see it, when I run 3-4 miles, I eat as if I just ran a half. In an hour, I walk about 3.25 miles on the treadmill with zero soreness.

It gets me to 10,000 steps each day.

I’m not famished afterward.

And I even get some work done while on the treadmill, although tonight that consisted only of doing a single Instagram post. Mostly, I walked (at 3.5 on the treadmill most of the time at various inclines) and watched Gary Vaynerchuk and Seinfeld re-runs — the one where Kramer butters himself, Bania prompts Jerry to tank a set and Elaine nicknames an airplane passenger, Vegetable Lasagna, while breaking up and making out with David Puddy.

But can you lose weight with only a walking regimen?

I think you can if you do it consistently without eating beyond your workout efforts. My plan is to not adjust my diet otherwise. Truth is: I eat a lot of fish, lean chicken and veggies. My culinary vices are the occasional donut (especially the maple bars at 7-Eleven), Fritos, A&W (and only A&W rootbeer) and Guinness Draught or Newcastle Brown Ale.

As of Oct. 23, I’m at 212.8 pounds. I might mix in some basketball, racquetball or some runs at my discretion — but mostly I’m just going to walk.

I’ll let you know how it goes.

Stay smooth.

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